Entry Points (2017)
359

Course Overview

“It’s a mark of our humanity that we want to understand how we live in society!”

Do you see yourself at the forefront of tackling some of the most crucial and pressing social, ecological and economic issues of our times? Do you regard yourself as ambitious and driven with a strong tendency for leadership, innovation and thinking and acting differently about local, national and global issues? Then the new and innovative Applied Social Sciences Degree is for you!

This new programme – beginning in 2017 - is aimed at motivated school leavers and mature students with a strong penchant towards the study of fundamental issues and concerns for Social Sciences. The programme will strongly focus on the applied nature of the Social Sciences and equip students with practical research skills, in addition to focussing on career development and readiness, and further educational opportunities. There will be an internship and dissertation or project component to the programme giving students real-world experience and knowledge of working in areas of Social Scientific inquiry. The growth in interdisciplinary study and research is building knowledge and the national capacity to respond to complex societal challenges providing new solutions that cannot be provided by one discipline alone. This innovative transdisciplinary degree programme will draw on key strengths of Schools and Disciplines right across the College of Arts, Research Institutes and Centres, and innovation and entrepreneurship programs across the University. Supporting and advocating the value of Social Scientific research to key decision-makers and policy designers, in addition to community activism and advocacy, will form an intrinsic part of the new programme ethos. 

Applications and Selections

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Minimum Grade H5 in two subjects and passes in four other subjects at O6/H7 Grades in the Leaving Certificate including Irish, English, another language, and three other subjects recognised for entry purposes.

Additional Requirements

Duration

4 years

Next start date

September 2018

A Level Grades (2017)

CCC or equivalent combination

Average intake

80

Closing Date

Next start date

September 2018

NFQ level

Mode of study

ECTS weighting

Award

CAO

GY123

PAC code

Course Outline

The new Applied Social Sciences programme will be a modular degree combining core and elective modules. The programme will draw from a number of key existing modules that are cognate to Applied Social Scientific inquiry and study. New, comprehensive and innovative modules are under development, which strongly focussed on enhancing student’s contemporary knowledge, research skills and employability, both nationally and internationally. Students will be given a broad understanding of the Social Sciences in years one and two, undertake an internship with an NGO or SME in year three, and will choose a specific study pathway in year four that is most appropriate to their requirements and future employability or continuing education needs. Students will choose from the following study pathways: 1) Environmental Social Studies (ESS), 2) Politics, Society & Identity, 3) Community Engagements & Development or, 4) Creativity, Innovation & Enterprise. 

Modules for 2017-18

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (60 Credits)

Required PS1102: Introduction to Psychology for the Social Sciences


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Psychology is concerned with the scientific study of behaviour and mental processes. The key goals of psychology are to understand and explain human behaviour and ultimately to enhance the quality of people’s lives. The module will address key paradigms and theories in Psychology and will review both historical perspectives and more recent contemporary research on the human mind and behaviour. Students will be introduced to the key factors and processes that influence perceptions, thoughts, behaviours and emotions. The module is intended to be broad in nature and will serve as an introduction to key areas in psychology including neuroscience, social psychology, developmental psychology, learning, cognitive psychology, social psychology and clinical psychology. Throughout the module, students will be encouraged to think about theories and perspectives provided on human behaviour and to reflect on the findings of psychological research. Students will also be encouraged to reflect on psychological perspectives of human behaviour and how it may vary from other disciplines.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of key psychological concepts that relate to the Social Sciences.
  2. Critically reflect on the psychological perspectives underpinning the science of human behaviour and mental processes.
  3. Assess the application of psychological theory and research in the Social Sciences to real world issues.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Psychological Science: International Student Edition" by Gazzaniga, M., Heatherton, T., & Halpern, D
    ISBN: 978039326313.
    Publisher: Norton
  2. "Psychology" by Gleitman, H., Gross, J. & Reisberg, D.
    ISBN: 9780393116823.
    Publisher: Norton
  3. "Psychology" by Martin, G.N., Carlson, N.R. & Buskist, W.
    ISBN: 9780273755524.
    Publisher: Pearson
The above information outlines module PS1102: "Introduction to Psychology for the Social Sciences" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC1110: Introduction to Economic Policy


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module explores, at an introductory level, the framework within which public and social policy is formed and operates in Ireland. The central aim is to impart an understanding of the constraints which frame public policy, and to enable structured assessments of the impact of policy, especially economic policy. We will cover several public policies that have an impact on the economy, society and on how we live.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Discuss the significance of public policy to the well-being of citizens
  2. Analyse and participate in public policy debates and discussion
  3. Identify the economic and social constraints involved in public policy issues
  4. Apply basic economic principles to various social policy issues, e.g. income inequality, minimum wages and housing.
  5. Describe the economic and social rationale for State and EU intervention in various sectors of society
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Social Policy in Ireland" by Healy, S., Reynolds B. and Collins, M., eds
    Publisher: The Liffey Press Dublin
  2. "A Rocky Road: the Irish Economy since the 1920s" by O Grada
    Publisher: Manchester University Press
  3. "The Economy of Ireland" by O’Hagan, J. and Newman, C., eds
    Publisher: Gill and Macmillan
The above information outlines module EC1110: "Introduction to Economic Policy" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required SP1100: Practising Sociology and Politics


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This seminar series is designed to promote inquiry based learning, to enhance practical scholarship skills while engaging with real world problems. Students work in small groups under the guidance of a seminar tutor. Students are introduced to critical reading, taking effective notes, gathering information and using the library, online sources and Blackboard, working in groups, giving presentations, preparing and writing essays, using academic language, revising and taking exams, preparing for future subject and career choices. There is an explicit focus on linking academic content and skills training, for example through the use of sociological and political science texts in skills training sessions
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Critically read and assess sociological and political science texts
  2. Prepare and effectively deliver an in-class presentation, supported by visual aids (e.g. Powerpoint, Prezi)
  3. Write short reports and summaries of readings
  4. Write well-structured and coherent essays that meet academic standards
  5. Use diverse tools and sources for information gathering (e.g. books, journal articles, online sources)
  6. Effectively utilise Blackboard as a learning tool
  7. Actively participate in small-group sessions and in-class discussions
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Sociology. A Global Introduction" by Macionis, J. J. and Plummer, K
    Publisher: Pearson
  2. "First Year Sociological and Political Studies – Sociology Textbook" by Vesna Malesevic
    Publisher: Pearson
  3. "A Sociology of Ireland" by Tovey, H. Share, P. Corcoran, M
    Publisher: Gill and Macmillan
  4. "Politics in the Republic of Ireland" by Coakley, J. and Gallagher, M
    Publisher: Routledge
  5. "Political Ideologies" by Heywood, A
    Publisher: Palgrave-Macmillan
The above information outlines module SP1100: "Practising Sociology and Politics" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required SP158: Introduction to Politics & Sociology


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Assessments
  • Written Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module SP158: "Introduction to Politics & Sociology" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required TI1100: Geography in Practice


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This module introduces first year geography students to a range of field-based learning environments designed to enhance their learning experience and develop their research competences. Supported by class-based teaching & technical instruction, students undertake a series of themed projects on identified field-sites involving observation & measurement techniques, production of cartographic, topographic & geological data, photo and video evidence, and relevant methods of analysis & reporting.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Comprehend a range of observation and sampling techniques
  2. Identify relevant primary and secondary sources of geographical data;
  3. Compile reports and essays in a well-structured and coherent way and in line with appropriate academic conventions
  4. Identify geographical phenomena in a field-based context
  5. Recognise the significance of a geographical perspective for research
  6. Demonstrate familiarity with relevant equipment and technical supports for fieldwork in geography
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Fieldwork for Human Geography" by Phillips, R. and Johns, J
    Publisher: Sage
  2. "An introduction to scientific research methods in geography" by Montello, D. and Sutton, P.C
  3. "How to argue (2nd ed.)" by Bonnett, A
  4. "Cite them right: The essentially referencing guide" by Pears, R. and Shields, G
    Publisher: UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
  5. "Health and Safety in th field" by Bullard, J.
    Publisher: London: Sage.
  6. "My visual diary" by Chaplin, E.
    Publisher: London: Routledge.
The above information outlines module TI1100: "Geography in Practice" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required TI150: Principles of Human Geography


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This course seeks to introduce key problems, concepts and contexts within human geography. Its focus is a contemporary one: it strives to illuminate the world of today by exploring and analysing the origin of central issues that make the headlines (or not) in the media and beyond. The course places lectures alongside the information given on Blackboard; for examination purposes, both are essential.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Recognise and differentiate the key concepts within human geography.
  2. Recognise and evaluate central issues and recent research within the field of human geography.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (85%)
  • Continuous Assessment (15%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module TI150: "Principles of Human Geography" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required BSS1100: Digital Citizenship


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The advances of technology, the impacts of social media, and the technological trends influencing our everyday lives have resulted in the creation of an online society, a global society. Just as we are citizens of our country, we are now citizens of the online society and as such we need to learn how to use these technologies appropriately. Moreover, we need to ensure that we learn how to use technology for the betterment of ourselves as well as society as a whole. Now more than ever it is crucial to understand our role as digital citizens in an ever-changing world. This module will help students to navigate this world and equip them with the knowledge required to be actively engaged in the digital community. It will also compare the behaviours expected in a face-to-face community with those expressed online and emphasise the importance of understanding the various technologies while practising safe, legal and ethical behaviours online.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Apply the principles of digital security and safety
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the language, symbols, and texts of digital technologies
  3. Participate in online educational, cultural, and economic activities in an ethical and legal way
  4. Debate the developing concept of digital citizenship
  5. Critique assumptions about integrity, ethical behaviour, privacy and freedom of speech in a digital world
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Digital Citizenship - The Internet, Society and Participation" by Mossberger, Karen, Tolbert, Caroline J. And McNeal, Ramona S
    ISBN: 978-081945606.
    Publisher: MA: The MIT Press
  2. "Young citizens in the digital age: political engagement, young people and new media" by Loader, Brian
    Publisher: Routledge
  3. "Society and Technological Change." by Volti, Rudi
    Publisher: Worth Publishers
The above information outlines module BSS1100: "Digital Citizenship" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required BSS1101: Introduction to the Study of the Social Sciences


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This interdisciplinary introductory module provides an introduction to the full spectrum of human behaviour, from geography, sociology, political sciences, psychology to economics. The module will introduce students to ideas and debates on contemporary society and will focus on a number of key areas at the centre of life in Ireland and the EU. The first section will explore changing cultures within our society through an analysis of contemporary ‘consumer society’. The issue of identity and difference will be the focus of the second section of the module. This will draw on topics of population change and migration in an Irish and European context. Using contemporary case studies the final section will examine ‘order’ and ‘disorder’ within societies and it will explore the participation and relationship society has to politics.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify key issues and debates at the centre of life in Ireland and the EU
  2. Demonstrate an understanding about how social scientists investigate and answer questions about society
  3. Write in a way that explores, synthesises and critiques academic material
  4. Effectively communicate information and arguments in a variety of forms
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Social science: An introduction to the study of society" by Hunt, E. F., & Colander, D. C.
    Publisher: Macmillan Pub. Co
  2. "European Social Problems" by Issacs, S
    Publisher: Routhledge
  3. "Consumer Society" by Smart, B
    Publisher: Sage
The above information outlines module BSS1101: "Introduction to the Study of the Social Sciences" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required SP159: Concepts and Practices of Politics & Sociology


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Assessments
  • Written Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module SP159: "Concepts and Practices of Politics & Sociology" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required TI151: Principles of Physical Geography


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This course is designed to provide insight and understanding to the fundamental concepts and principles of physical geography as an academic discipline. In doing this, the course explores how the physical environment functions; how different environmental systems interact and how the physical environment impacts on human activities. The course explores the various components that make up these environmental systems, such as the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere. In addition the course also provides some understanding of how these fundamentals apply to Ireland and in so doing gives an insight into the richness of the physical geography of Ireland.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify major earth processes and landforms and how they influence climate and species distribution.
  2. Recognise how physical geography data are presented within the scientific community.
  3. Examine and apply relationships between physical processes and current societal issues (e.g., climate change, flooding, coastal management).
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (15%)
  • Department-based Assessment (15%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Fundamentals of Physical Geography" by Robert E. Gabler, Dorothy Irene Sack, James Petersen
    ISBN: 9781473714014.
    Publisher: Cengage
The above information outlines module TI151: "Principles of Physical Geography" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Year 2 (60 Credits)

Year 3 (60 Credits)

Year 4 (60 Credits)

Further Education

Graduates of the Applied Social Sciences will be equipped with the talents, knowledge and experience to undertake a wide range of research-based or taught postgraduate programmes. With its strong focus on the applied nature of the Social Sciences, students undertaking the programme develop very practical contemporary skills that are immensely advantageous to the broad range of postgraduate opportunities available. The University offers an array of taught master’s degree and postgraduate diploma programmes of interest to Applied Social Sciences graduates. In the past number of years, the College has also pioneered the development of structured PhD programmes which combine the traditional research dissertation of the PhD with generic and discipline-specific training modules designed to enhance students’ skills and employability. The internship in year three of the programme will be an invaluable asset in the toolkit of graduates of the Applied Social Sciences programme.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

The Applied Social Sciences programme offers clear pathways that lead to an array of career opportunities across a wide range of interests including governmental, agency and business sectors. Guidance will be offered throughout the programme to ensure students are undertaking the most appropriate modules for their own personal career goals and development. Careers post-graduation include (but are not limited to); Irish and international NGO’s, Agencies and authorities at local, national, EU and international levels, Public Service, Politics, Irish Aid Programmes, Community Work, Security and Crime Prevention, Contemporary Urban Planning, Environmental & Sustainability Policy, International Development, Human Resource Management, Business and Industry, Marketing, Industrial Relations, Journalism, the media and social research. Moreover, with its emphasis on broad societal contemporary challenges, the programme offers new and existing opportunities for students to develop careers in business, industry and commerce, working with private sector companies, SMEs and multinationals, by proving unique understandings of innovation and entrepreneur processes and practices.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Students who choose the Applied Social Sciences degree programme at NUI Galway are innovator and potential leaders seeking to understand and tackle the most demanding social, ecological and economic issues in contemporary society. They are frontrunners in informed decision-making pursuing accurate and truthful solutions to global issues and concerns based on fundamentally sound empirical research. The programme gives students the tools to address and tackle these grand societal concerns and problems. Graduates in Applied Social Science offer a wide range of skills that are invaluable to present-day employers across the public, private and third sectors. These include the ability to understand complex issues in a holistic manner, on individual and cultural and societal levels; research, analyse and evaluate data critically; question assumptions; understand people, institutions and their relationships; understand processes of change; make reasoned arguments; communicate concisely and clearly and solve pressing problems. 

What do social science graduates do?

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€5,822 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Tuition

€2,598 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Student Contribution

€3,000 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Non EU

€12,750 p.a. 2017/18
EU Fees 2017/18:
- Tuition: may be paid by the Irish Government on your behalf see - free fee initiative.
- Student Contribution: €3,000 - payable by all students but may by paid by SUSI if you apply and are deemed eligible for a means tested SUSI grant.
- Student Levy:  €224 - payable by all students and is not covered by SUSI.

Find out More

Dr Frances Fahy
Head of Geography, Senior Lecturer
Room 106, Arts Science Concourse
NUI Galway
T: +353 91 49 2315
E: frances.fahy@nuigalway.ie

Dr Mike Hynes
Room 323, 2nd Floor
School of Political Science & Sociology
Áras Moyola, NUI Galway
T: +353 91 49 5104
E: mike.hynes@nuigalway.ie