Course Overview

Why choose this programme?

This MSc programme aims to provide students with the underpinning knowledge and practical skills to pursue a successful career in biomedical science. The course is designed for those who wish to follow careers as Biomedical Scientists in research, the Health Service or in the wider context of biomedical science (including Medical Technologies, Bio-pharmaceutical and other Healthcare industries). Using state of the art technologies and a range of skills from scientific, engineering and clinical disciplines to understand and investigate questions originating in biology and medicine. You will be introduced to science and engineering disciplines you will not have covered in your undergraduate studies. You will have access to some of Ireland’s leading researchers in this area. A major objective of the course is to introduce students to an interdisciplinary approach to Biomedical Science, which utilises technologies and skills from a wide spectrum of scientific, engineering and clinical disciplines.

Programme objectives

The MSc in Biomedical Science programme’s primary objective is to provide students with the underpinning knowledge and practical skills to pursue a successful career in biomedical science. 

  • The course is designed for those who wish to follow careers as Biomedical Scientists in research, the Health Service or in the wider context of biomedical science including Medical Technologies, Bio-pharmaceutical and other Healthcare industries.
  • Using state of the art technologies and a range of skills from scientific, engineering and clinical disciplines to understand and investigate questions originating in biology and medicine.
  • You will be introduced to science and engineering disciplines you will not have covered in your undergraduate studies. You will have access to some of Ireland’s leading researchers in this area.
  • A major objective of the course is to introduce students to an interdisciplinary approach to Biomedical Science, which utilises technologies and skills from a wide spectrum of scientific, engineering and clinical disciplines. 

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Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via The Postgraduate Applications Centre (PAC). PAC application code: GYS03. Selection is based on the candidate's academic record at an undergraduate level and their aptitude for the course.

In order to apply for this programme please complete all of the steps below:

Step One:  Ensure you are eligible—entry criteria

  • Graduates who have a first class or second class honours level 8 BSc degree in a relevant biological or biomedical sciences, physical sciences or engineering field 
  • Graduates with a Level 7 degree and who can demonstrate that they have at least 2-3 years relevant experience in research or the Medical Technology, Healthcare or Biotechnology industry 
  • English language proficiency of IELTS 6.5 (with no band less than 6.0 in each element of the test) or equivalent

Step Two:  Have all of the supporting documentation in place

Visit our Supporting Documents website for document requirements for this course.

Step Three: Ensure that you meet the English Language requirements

All applicants, whose first language is not English must present one of the following qualifications in the English language and have no less than 6.5 in ANY component. NOTE: Language tests must be undertaken no more than two years prior to commencement of your programme at the University

IELTS

TOEFL

Pearson PTE

6.5

88

61

6.5

88

61

6.5

88

61

 The NUI Galway TOEFL institution code is 8861.

Any PAC application queries should be emailed to postgradadmissions@nuigalway.ie 

Who Teaches this Course

For information on the Biomedical Science programme team, click here.

Requirements and Assessment

Assessments

Students are formally assessed through a range of continuous assessment and end-of-semester examinations in Semester 1. Continuous assessment involves written assignments, projects, presentations, video pitches and case studies. Written examinations include short answer examinations, multiple-choice-question examinations during the semester, and end of Semester 1 examinations in December.

Assessment of students in Semester 2 is through continuous assessment of each module, through a combination of written assignments, evaluations of laboratory practical skills, laboratory reports, workshop-based problem solving, oral presentations.  

The Research Project dissertation is also assessed.  Assessment includes examination of the written research thesis, as well as oral and poster presentations, and assessment of student performance in conducting their research project.

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

  • Graduates who have a first class or second class honours Level 8 BSc degree in a relevant biological or biomedical sciences, physical sciences or engineering field 
  • Graduates with a Level 7 degree and who can demonstrate that they have at least 2–3 years relevant experience in research or the Medical Technology, Healthcare or Biotechnology industry 
  • English language proficiency of IELTS 6.5 (with no band less than 6.0 in each element of the test) or equivalent

Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year, full-time

Next start date

September 2018

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

16

Closing Date

Please refer to the review/closing date webpage.

Next start date

September 2018

NFQ level

Mode of study

Taught

ECTS weighting

90

Award

CAO

PAC code

GYS03

Course Outline

Programme modules

Full list of modules, and their detail is online here.

Programme structure 

 Biomedical Science

The MSc in Biomedical science (90 ECTS) is a full-time Level 9 programme course extending over a continuous 12-month period from September to August. The MSc is intended to introduce students to science and engineering disciplines they would not have covered in their undergraduate studies.

The first two semesters consist of taught modules (60 ECTS; see module details for more information) that will acquaint you with the basics of Biology, Chemistry and Physics, depending on your background. The modules are devoted to coursework through a series of lectures and tutorials and assessed by means of a written exam and/or continuous assessment. Students complete both scientific and business modules. Students are expected to carry out a business project by preparing a written report and presentation on a biomedical science-related topic. Also during the first two semesters, there will be a series of practical sessions that will familiarise you with different forms of instrumentation and techniques. A laboratory-based research project (30 ECTS) is undertaken in the 3rd semester (April – August). Toward the end of the research project, students are asked to present their findings at an MSc Research Symposium day.  There is a prize for the most outstanding MSc Research presentation on the day.

 

 

MSc symposium winners MSc Research Symposium Winners. The Image on the left is of Mark Gleeson (2015 MSc Biomedical Science graduate) receives his trophy from Professor Vincent O’Flaherty, Head of the School of Natural Sciences, NUI, Galway. The image on the right is of the 2016 winner, Erika Despard (2015 MSc Biomedical Science graduate) being presented with her trophy by Professor Terry Smith (Programme Director) and Dr Mary Ní Fhlathartaigh (Programme Co-ordinator).

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Modules for 2017-18

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (90 Credits)

Required BES556: Research & Minor Thesis


12 months long | Credits: 30

The aim of this module is to provide students with hands-on experience of the rigours of scientific research, from experimental design, to execution of research. Students are educated as to best practice for reporting their results. Where possible, project work is carried out in the student’s place of work. Alternatively, a suitable project is provided on-campus.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Carry out a literature search on topic of research project.
  2. Design and follow an experimental plan projected to meet research objectives.
  3. Monitor progress of research and adjust experimental plan accordingly.
  4. Write good-quality masters thesis that summarises, in scientific language, the background to the research, methods used and results.
  5. Produce a postgraduate-level discussion of the research carried out, as part of the thesis write-up.
  6. Communicate the rigorous approach to research that is required for successful completion of a research project.
Assessments
  • Research (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module BES556: "Research & Minor Thesis" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required BME405: Tissue Engineering


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Tissue Engineering (BME405) provides students with a comprehensive overview into the scope and potential of this evolving field. This subject addresses the use of natural, synthetic and ceramic biomaterials as scaffolds in tissue engineering; scaffold function, mechanics and fabrication methods; cellular processes that contribute to tissue dynamics (e.g. morphogenesis, regeneration and repair); cell sources, mechanobiology and the use of bioreactors as biomimetic environments; in vitro and in vivo tissue engineering strategies for bone, cartilage and skin regeneration; and ethical and regulatory issues in tissue engineering. The subject integrates aspects of biomedical engineering, biomaterials science and biology and provides functional clinical examples in this evolving area of technology.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. 1. Discuss the sources, selection and potential challenges of using stem cells for tissue engineering.
  2. 2. Describe the role of cellular fate processes in tissue morphogenesis, repair and regeneration.
  3. 3. Describe the protein structures and composition of native extracellular matrices.
  4. 4. Discuss the functional requirements, design, fabrication and biomaterials selection criteria for tissue engineering scaffolds.
  5. 5. Predict the mechanical behaviour of tissue engineering scaffolds using cellular solids theory.
  6. 6. Use fluid mechanics theory to characterise mechanical stimulation in tissue engineering scaffolds in flow perfusion bioreactors.
  7. 7. Describe experimental techniques in mechanobiology and outline the role of mechanical signals on stem cell differentiation.
  8. 8. Outline the steps involved in the development of in vitro and in vivo strategies for tissue engineering for bone, cartilage and skin regeneration.
  9. 9. Prepare a manuscript for peer-review according to the publication guidelines of a scientific journal.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (40%)
  • Continuous Assessment (60%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Principles of Tissue Engineering, R Lanza, R Langer and J Vacanti, Elsevier, (2007). Functional Tissue Engineering, F Guilak, D Butler, S Goldstein, D Mooney (Editor) Springer (2007)." by n/a
The above information outlines module BME405: "Tissue Engineering" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PH339: Radiation and Medical Physics


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module provides an introduction to the medical imaging and instrumentation aspects of real imaging environments, ranging from obsolete modalities to the modern tomographic imaging modalities (such as PET and SPECT). This module also covers the fundamental processes involved in forming images using ionising radiation, safety issues associated with ionising radiation and methods of radiation detection.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. define terms and explain concepts relating to the physical principles covered by this module’s syllabus.
  2. describe the physical laws that connect terms and concepts covered by this module’s syllabus and, where appropriate, derive the mathematical relationships between those terms and concepts.
  3. outline applications to real-world situations of the physical principles covered by this module’s syllabus.
  4. analyze physical situations using concepts, laws and techniques learned in this module.
  5. identify and apply pertinent physics concepts, and appropriate mathematical techniques, to solve physics problems related to the content of this module’s syllabus.
  6. analyze data, interpret results and draw appropriate conclusions.
  7. prepare scientific reports.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module PH339: "Radiation and Medical Physics" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required BES513: Materials, Science & Biomaterials


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The understanding of biomaterials encompasses fundamental knowledge of medicine, biology, chemistry, and material science. The biomaterials field rests on a foundation of engineering principles. There is also a compelling human side to the therapeutic and diagnostic application of biomaterials. This course addresses the fundamental properties and applications of biomaterials (synthetic and natural) that are used in contact with biological systems.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Summarise the issues surrounding biocompatibility and ethics in the use of biomaterials.
  2. Communicate the molecular and physiological features of biomaterials, including biomechanical properties, particularly in relation to orthopaedic applications.
  3. Describe the fundamentals of biopolymers – their structure, synthesis and characterisation.
  4. List biomaterial applications in orthopaedics and cardiovascular medicine.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Materials Science and Engineering," by Callister WD Jr.
  2. "An Introduction to Materials in Medicine," by Ratner B et al
    Publisher: Academic Press
The above information outlines module BES513: "Materials, Science & Biomaterials" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required BES5103: Applied Biomedical Sciences


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Over the course of semesters 1 and 2, 5-6 laboratory practicals (depending on size of effort required) are completed. Topics may include cell culture, cell and molecular biology, scanning electron microscopy, biomechanics, mass spectrometry. Industry experts and visits outline recent advancements in biomedical applications and applications.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate ability to culture mammalian cells in vitro using aseptic technique, including quantifying cell number, assessing cell viability, passaging of cells, and analysis of protein expression in cells by Western blotting.
  2. Apply molecular biology techniques, including purification of RNA from in vitro cultured cells, cDNA synthesis from purified RNA, real-time PCR amplification of target cDNAs, and quantification of RNA expression.
  3. Explain the applications of SEM, Mass Spectrometry and biomedical engineering technologies in biomedical science.
  4. Recommend equipment and protocol for testing mechanical properties of medical devices and tissue
  5. Communicate verbally and in writing on biomedical science subjects
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module BES5103: "Applied Biomedical Sciences" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required MG529: Introduction To Business


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module MG529: "Introduction To Business" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required BES5104: Regulatory Compliance in Healthcare Manufacturing


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module aims to equip students with an introduction to the regulatory pathways for placing medical devices and pharmaceuticals on the market within the EU, US and globally. It explains the legislation applicable and guidelines available to medical device and pharmaceutical manufacturers. There will be a particular focus on the manufacturing processes and controls involved within these industries.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the scope and functions of the regulatory framework pertaining to pharmaceutical and medical devices including medical device classification.
  2. Demonstrate a detailed understanding of the main US, EU and global regulations.
  3. Understand concepts to enable learners to work effectively with regulatory affairs professionals.
  4. Develop an understanding of how regulatory issues affect the manufacturing and development of medical device and pharmaceutical products.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of Good Manufacturing Practices and Quality Management Systems and related control processes with respect to the medical device and pharmaceutical industry.
  6. Describe the scope and functions of the processes for bringing a new drug to market, starting with drug discovery and the clinical trial process and ending in obtaining marketing approval.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Medical Product Regulatory Affairs" by John J. Tobin, Gary Walsh
    ISBN: 9783527318773.
    Publisher: Wiley-VCH
    Chapters: All
The above information outlines module BES5104: "Regulatory Compliance in Healthcare Manufacturing" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required BES554: Molecular Medicine


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

The molecular mechanisms underlying diseases including cancer, immuno-deficient and neurodegenerative disorders is described. The basis for gene and stem cell approaches to system regeneration is then summarised. A poster preparation and presentation activity enables the investigation by students of aspects molecular medicine not directly covered in lectures., including the mechanisms underlying current treatments, the development of novel therapeutics, including gene or stem cell therapies.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Depict challenges of drug discovery and how molecular mechanisms of action of current drugs vary.
  2. Summarise the molecular mechanisms implicated in the development of diseases such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimers disease, diabetes.
  3. Explain the basis for current cancer treatments and medications used to treat the major neurodegenerative disorders.
  4. Communicate the principles underlying the development of gene therapies and summarise the relative advanatges and disadvantages of different gene delivery stratagies.
  5. Compare the properties of stem cells isolated from different sources and give details of the clinical use of a stem cell based therapy
  6. In cooperation with a fellow-student, produce a poster depicting signalling pathways associated with an acute or chronic disorders, as well as current and experimental treatments.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module BES554: "Molecular Medicine" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional BES519: Scientific Writing


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Based largely on a peer-review exercise, this module aims to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the process of scientific publication. Topics include journal author guidelines, review article types, how to write a good review article, how to produce a critique of a review article, how to write to a journal editor and to respond to reviewer comments. Other apsects discussed include open access publishing, paper authorship, the ethics of publication, predatory journals

Learning Outcomes
  1. Recognise and explain scientific writing
  2. Describe the structure of different kinds of scientific papers
  3. Summarise the different steps in the publication process
  4. Explain the aims, principles and limiations of the peer review process
  5. Produce a well-written critique of a mini-review paper
  6. Respond to peer reviews and write a letter to a journal editor
  7. Produce a well-written mini-review on a specialist topic
  8. Define what is meant by 'journal impact factor' (IF)
  9. Use Journal IFs and other journal information, to select appropriate journals for paper submission
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module BES519: "Scientific Writing" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional AN230: Human Body Structure


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Human Body Structure is delivered by the anatomy department to students at the first, second and masters level in university for whom anatomy is not a core degree element who require a sound basic knowledge of the structure of the human body. The content will cover topics including the following: * Organisation of human body, anatomical terminology, the principles of support and movement, the control systems of the human body, maintenance and continuity of the body and finally, biomechanics and functional anatomy of the limbs.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Established a sound basic knowledge of the organization and structure of the human body including the location and anatomical relations of the major organ systems
  2. Developed a basic understanding of the principles of support and movement, the control systems of the body, maintenance and continuity of the human body.
  3. Understand and describe the biomechanics and functional anatomy of the human limbs and musculoskeletal system
  4. Explain how specific aspects of human anatomy relate to your field of study
  5. Begun to develop your ability to look up and synthesize anatomical subject matter in a self-directed manner
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
  • Computer-based Assessment (70%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Introduction to the human body" by Gerard J. Tortora, Bryan Derrickson.
    ISBN: 9781118583180.
    Publisher: New York; Wiley
  2. "Human Anatomy" by Michael McKinley,Valerie O'Loughlin,Ronald Harris,Elizabeth Pennefather-O'Brien
    ISBN: 9780073525730.
    Publisher: McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math
    Chapters: 2017-08-12T00:00:00
The above information outlines module AN230: "Human Body Structure" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional BG5104: Protein Technology


Spring | Credits: 5

This module will cover topics on the application of protein biology to Biotechnology. This includes principles of protein production and purification, proteomic analysis, protein glycobiology and industrial scale-up of protein purification. This module is assessed by written examination in the SPRING exam session.

Learning Outcomes
  1. discuss the implementation and usefulness of proteomics to biological research
  2. evaluate and design protein production, extraction and purification strategies
  3. appraise the many roles glycans play in health and diseases, as well as in clinical and industrial applications
  4. describe and propose solutions to bottlenecks associated with the scale up of recombinant protein production from lab to industrial scale
  5. demonstrate knowledge and understanding of industrial enzymes
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module BG5104: "Protein Technology" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SI317: Human Body Function


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

The ‘Human Body Function’ module teaches students the complex nature of how the mammalian body functions through the study of its component organ systems. Specifically, the following areas are covered: Body fluids and fluid compartments, haematology, nerve and muscle physiology, cardiovascular physiology, respiratory physiology, immunology and endocrinology.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Know the distribution of water between the body fluid compartements and understand the role of body water in cell and system function.
  2. Know the components of blood, understand the process of blood clotting and understand the principles of the ABO and rhesus blood groups.
  3. Know the structure and function of nerve and muscle cells.
  4. Understand how a nerve impulse is generated and propagated.
  5. Understand the process of muscle contraction, and how nerves can stimulate muscle cells.
  6. Understand the autonomic nervous system.
  7. Know the structure and function of the heart and its electrophysiology, focusing on the electrical and mechanical events at each stage of the cardiac cycle.
  8. Know the importance of blood pressure, and understand the basic principles of regulation.
  9. Understand how breathing is performed and know the volumes and capacities associated with respiration.
  10. Understand how oxygen and carbon dioxide are transported, and how oxygen delivery is regulated and controlled.
  11. Understand the basics of hormone function, with a focus on glucose metabolism and the functions of growth hormone.
  12. Understand the basics of immune defense.
  13. Know the divisions of the central nervous system and have a basic knowledge of how the different areas function.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Human Physiology" by Stuart Ira Fox
  2. "Introduction to the Human Body" by Tortora & Derrickson
The above information outlines module SI317: "Human Body Function" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional PM208: Fundamental Concepts in Pharmacology


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module introduces students to fundamental pharmacological concepts of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. A combination of lectures, tutorials and workshops will be used.

Learning Outcomes
  1. describe the main drug targets
  2. interpret dose response curves for agonists, antagonists, inverse agonists
  3. calculate molarities, concentrations, volumes required in making solutions
  4. access and critically analyse and interpret pharmacological data
  5. describe the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion for specific drugs
  6. explain the effects of different routes of administration on absorption of drugs, and effects of food and drug interactions on drug disposition
  7. derive pharmacokinetic data and use them to predict clinical properties of drugs
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
  • Computer-based Assessment (70%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Pharmacology" by Rang, H.P., Dale, Ritter, Flower & Henderson
    Publisher: Churchill Livingstone
  2. "Principles of Pharmacology" by Golan, D.E., et al
  3. "Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews Pharmacology" by Harvey, R.A.
The above information outlines module PM208: "Fundamental Concepts in Pharmacology" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional BES5102: Cell & Molecular Biology: Advanced Technologies


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module it is designed to bring students to a common point where all will share the appropriate biological knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals in cellular and molecular biology. The module explores the following: cell composition; sub-cellular organelles; structure of DNA and RNA; transcription, protein synthesis; cell signalling, cell cycle; PubMed, DNA recombination, PCR; transformation, transfection; advanced molecular and cellular biology techniques.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Illustrate the structure of DNA, explaining how DNA is replicated during the polymerase chain reaction technique.
  2. Explain what is meant by the 'genetic code' and how it relates to protein synthesis.
  3. Carry out a Pubmed search in order to identify molecules implicated in a human disease chosen by you.
  4. Use the National cancer and Biological Institute (NCBI) nucleotide database to discover the DNA sequence encoding a protein of your choice and determine the length of the coding sequence and the number of amino acids contained in the protein encoded.
  5. Describe how mammalian cell culture, PCR, DNA recombination, DNA plasmids, bacterial transformation and cellular transfection can be used to understand protein function, localisation and possible relevance to disease.
  6. Name the major structural components a mammalian cell and its constituent organelles.
  7. List cytoskeletal, extracellular matrix, membrane and signalling proteins involved in mammalian cell interactions with each other and with the extracellular environment.
  8. Explain how the mitochondria meet the energy requirements of the cell.
  9. Recognise cellular organelles involved in trafficking newly-synthesised proteins through and out of the cell.
  10. Summarise the main steps and in the cell cycle and proteins involved in regulation of each stage.
  11. Study and present on advanced technologies in cell and molecular biology
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "The Cell: A Molecular Approach" by Geoffrey M. Cooper, Robert E. Hausman
    Publisher: ASM press
The above information outlines module BES5102: "Cell & Molecular Biology: Advanced Technologies" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional BME502: Advanced Tissue Engineering


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Advanced Tissue Engineering (BME502) builds on the students understanding of the field of tissue engineering obtained through the first semester tissue engineering course. The subject allows for increased involvement of the students in the field through project work and the planning and completion of laboratory experiments. Through regular feedback, the students will gain an appreciation of working in the field of tissue engineering. Specific lecture topics to be covered include bioactive materials, biomimetics and experimental planning, as well as specific subfields of tissue engineering, such as neural, cardiovascular and vital organ regeneration.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. 1. Describe the concepts of wound healing, immunoresponse and angiogenesis and their importance in the field of tissue engineering.
  2. 2. Design and complete an experiment to investigate a tissue engineering concept in vitro.
  3. 3. Describe in vitro and in vivo strategies for various sub-fields of tissue engineering, including, neural, cardiovascular and vital organ regeneration.
  4. 4. Discuss the merit of bioactive materials, biomemetics and biomaterial functionalisation in tissue engineering.
  5. 5. Prepare a grant application for the investigation of a tissue engineering related problem through the development of a novel method of treatment.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Principles of Tissue Engineering, Langer, Vacanti; Functional Tissue Engineering, Guilak" by n/a
The above information outlines module BME502: "Advanced Tissue Engineering" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional MA324: Introduction to Bioinformatics (Honours)


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

The course will give students an appreciation of the application of computers and algorithms in molecular biology. This includes foundation knowledge of bioinformatics; the ability to perform basic bioinformatic tasks; and to discuss current bioinformatic research with respect to human health.

Learning Outcomes
  1. outline key bioinformatics principles and approaches
  2. discuss the relevance of bioinformatics to medicine
  3. obtain molecular sequence data from public repositories
  4. implement key bioinformatics algorithms by hand on toy datasets
  5. use bioinformatics software tools, including tools for sequence alignment, homology searching, phylogenetic inference and promoter analysis;
  6. describe key high throughput data generation technologies and the steps involved in data pre-processing and basic analysis of these data.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Bioinformatics ; Sequence and Genome Analysis" by David W Mount
    ISBN: 9788123909981.
    Publisher: CBS Publishers & Distributors
  2. "INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS." by Arthur M. Lesk
    ISBN: 9780195685251.
    Publisher: OUP
  3. "Bioinformatics" by [edited by] Andreas D. Baxevanis, B. F. Francis Ouellette
    ISBN: 9780471383901.
    Publisher: Wiley-Interscience
The above information outlines module MA324: "Introduction to Bioinformatics (Honours)" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional BES5105: Literature analysis and presentation skills in Biomedical Research


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module teaches the student how to critically analyse scientific literature, and to present their analysis clearly and concisely. Students will also learn how to conduct literature searches, and how to write a technical report or literature review about biomedical science and research topics. This is relevant for assignments and the research dissertation and as well as developing vital technical writing skills necessary for a successful scientific career. Students will also develop their transferable skills on this interactive module through a range of written assignments and oral presentations.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Discuss and critically analyse a range of scientific and biomedical science topics
  2. Communicate verbally and in writing on scientific and biomedical science topics
  3. Conduct and synthesise an academic literature search relevant to a proposed biomedical science topic
  4. Present research data and findings in a critically reflective manner
  5. Produce a well-written and referenced literature -review on a specific biomedical science topic
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module BES5105: "Literature analysis and presentation skills in Biomedical Research" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Biomedical Science Why choose this course

Located in the heart of Ireland’s biomedical device industry cluster, NUI Galway offers excellent career opportunities for biomedical science graduates. A wide variety of career opportunities exists for graduates of this programme. These include research and development in medical devices or phar‌maceuticals in an industrial or academic setting, medical device sales, work in hospital laboratories and further postgraduate studies.

Furthermore, this programme is a springboard to PhD research opportunities. Graduates of the MSc in Biomedical Science have gone on to work within the medical technology and pharmaceutical industries, hospitals and academia. Galway is a global hub for the medical device industry so NUI Galway graduates are well-placed to avail of employment opportunities with a wide range of multi-national and indigenous medical technologies organisations. Recent graduates have found employment with a range of companies, including Boston Scientific, Regeneron, Abbott, Allergan, and Pfizer.

‌‌Biomedical Science

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Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€7,250 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Tuition

€7,026 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Non EU

€15,500 p.a. 2018/19
For further information on postgraduate funding opportunities and scholarships see here.

Find out More

Academic Course Director
Prof Terry Smith            
T: +353 91 492 022 | E: 
terry.smith@nuigalway.ie   ‌

Academic Course Co-ordinator
Dr Mary Ní Fhlathartaigh
T: +353 91 495 323 | E: mary.nifhlathartaigh@nuigalway.ie


What Our Students Say

Katie

Katie Gillian |   BSc in Sport Science, University of Limerick

I wanted to pursue a career in research, having come from a background in Sport Science I decided to do a MSc in Biomedical Science. I originally thought the transition would be difficult and although the course was challenging at times, I thoroughly enjoyed every minute of it. The broad range of modules that were taught on the course meant the masters could be applied to many aspects of the biomedical science field from industry to research. The course exceeded my expectations, in that everything was taught clearly and there was a good balance between lectures and labs. I did not have much lab experience prior to the masters however when completed I had learn a variety of techniques from cell culture to PCR. I completed my thesis for the masters in the Department of Surgery in the Translational Research Facility researching Breast Cancer Lymphangiogenesis. After completing my thesis I was offered the opportunity to stay on with the group to do a PhD and I will be starting it in January 2016. Overall I would strongly recommend this course to anyone interested in pursuing a career in biomedical science industry or research.
Richard

Richard Bennett |   BSc in Chemistry, NUI Galway

The MSc. in Biomedical Science at NUI, Galway is a truly interdisciplinary course. Courses such as tissue engineering and molecular medicine gave me an insight into research that I had previously not seen. After finishing a BSc. in chemistry this course was perfect for me to gain further skills and act as a stepping stone in my career. The flexibility offered through the optional modules allows each student to cover the essential core modules while allowing for tailoring to each individual. Modules such as validation and scientific writing offered transferable skills that will be beneficial regardless of career path. The experience gained during these modules are very helpful whether continuing in industry or academia. In addition to the fantastic course structure, the contacts and friends made over the course of the year were invaluable. I consider myself privileged to have been part of the MSc. Biomedical Science group and I would recommend the course highly to prospective students.
Ivor

Ivor Geoghegan |   BSc in Anatomy, NUI Galway

The MSc Biomedical Science course exceeded my expectations. It gave me a diverse grounding in many different subjects and allowed me to specialise in the area of Tissue Engineering with the modules “Tissue Engineering”, “Advanced Tissue Engineering”, and “Biomaterials”. The course was very well organised and I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it to anyone with an interest in biology, physics, or engineering.
Shane

Shane Spellman |   Current Student (BSc in Sport Science)

The reason I chose the Biomedical Science course in the first place was due to my interest in the biological systems, disease and ultimately how cutting edge technology could significantly improve the outcome for countless patients globally. Initially my interest was sparked by the module titles and when I began the course I wasn’t disappointed as each module has given me a deep understanding of the basics, the more complex underpinnings of the subject and ultimately the research that is currently being carried out in the field to date

What Employers Say

John

John Kilmartin |   Senior Director of Regulatory Affairs in Medtronic, Galway

Mr John Kilmartin Senior Director of Regulatory Affairs in Medtronic (based in Galway) “We have had a number of visits from the MSc Biomedical Science programme here in Medtronic, all of the participants have been really engaged and we are delighted to give the students this opportunity. We are really pleased with the course content and calibre of the students.”