Course Overview

Climate change poses many threats to agriculture, including reduction of agricultural productivity, production stability and incomes in areas of the world that already have high levels of food insecurity and limited means of coping with adverse weather. The new MSc ACT is a two-year international programme which equips students with tools to transform agriculture to feed a growing population in the face of a changing climate without hindering the natural resource base

The Masters in Agriculture, Climate change, Transitions (ACT) is offered by a consortium of six European universities, in close partnership with a network of international groups, third country universities, research institutes and civil society organisations that share in common the aim to develop capacities on the long term to reduce impact of climate change on food security and, in return, to mitigate the change by sustainable agricultural practices.

The course develops the following Graduate Attributes: 

  • the capacity to identify agricultural and rural development issues;
  • ability to support processes of technical and organisational change in rural areas;
  • critically assess development actions.  

Ag development capacities

  • Assess agricultural development and food security options in a given environment : alternative technologies or genetic resources, land use options, cropping and animal rearing/pastoral systems, market based and non market oriented modes of organisation, value chains, financial options (including insurance);
  • Identify the critical aspects of professional situations within natural resource management in relation to agricultural activities;
  • Have a clear understanding of the relationships in the natural resources-plant-environment continuum (the climate, crop, livestock, and natural risk management);
  • Describe the patterns characterising these situations and analyse the social and economic challenges linked to them;
  • Support processes of technical and organisational change in rural areas and provide development support;
  • Evaluate development projects and programmes

Climate change capacities

  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of climate change and its linkage to the global environmental changes ;
  • Evaluate opportunities that may arise from environmental and climate changes, as well as assess risks of climatic changes and climate variability ;
  • Assess environmental impact (LCA, C sequestration…) for agricultural and development proposals or existing value chains.
  • Master the use of modelisation tools for a prospective vision of climate change modalities and impact and or the mitigation effect of diverse development scenarios.

Ethics, soft skills and communication

  • Work in multidisciplinary teams and communicate effectively using a wide range of materials.
  • Think, communicate, cooperate and solve problems from an interdisciplinary perspective;
  • Demonstrate capacity to innovate efficiently, manage change and work among communities;
  • Express and communicate scientific knowledge and concepts across a range of professions.

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Applications and Selections

Who Teaches this Course

The NUI Galway component of the MSc.ACT is delivered by the research experts of the Plant & AgriBiosciences Research Centre; a full list of PABC research groups and Principal Investigators can be found at: www.plantagbiosciences.org/content/principal-investigators-research-groups.

It is delivered in conjunction with the Agrinatura programme (agrinatura-eu.eu), the leading grouping of European universities and research organizations supporting agricultural development in order to improve people's lives.

Details of the wider consortium and its associated partners can be found at: http://master-act.eu/partners/main-partners.

Requirements and Assessment

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Applicants should follow the procedures described on http://master-act.eu/ BEFORE beginning their PAC application.

Requirements for entry are:

  • Bachelor of Sciences (180 ECTS) or equivalent in Agricultural Sciences, or a BA in Social Sciences with a particular experience in agriculture.
  • Excellent academic background (1st class degree normally required).
  • IELTS 6.5 (non-native speakers of English). 
  • A cover letter and letters from at least two referees. 

Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year (NB 1 year is spent at NUI Galway during the ‘M1’ of the MSc; the MSc ACT is completed in a second year ‘M2’ at a partner European institution)

Next start date

September 2018

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

N/A

Closing Date

Deadlines roughly end-January & end-May, see master-act.eu 

Next start date

September 2018

NFQ level

Mode of study

ECTS weighting

120 (of which 55 are delivered by NUI Galway during the M1).

Award

CAO

PAC code

GYS01

Course Outline

Carried by a multidisciplinary team of researchers, specialised trainers and professionals involved in agricultural development in developing countries, the MSc.ACT is a joint degree based on a robust and simple system of mobilities between EU partners.

Students study for their first year (two semesters) in NUI Galway, and for their second year in one of our partner organisations (a further two semesters): BOKU Vienna, Austria (in English); the University of Catania, Italy (in Italian); or SupAgro Montpellier, France (in French).

At NUI Galway, students will study 55 ECTS of taught material, including topics such as Climate Change, Agriculture & Global Food Security; Gender, Agriculture and Climate Change; Natural Resources & Livelihoods; AgriBiology; Soil Sciences; Plant & Agri-Biotechnologies; and Understanding AgriBusiness & AgriFood Market Trends.

Once based at the partner organisation in their second year, students will also perform a 30 ECTS research project.

Modules for 2016-17

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (55 Credits)

Required PAB5104: Gender, Agriculture & Climate Change


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module will address climate change from a social perspective, including considering how its causes and effects relate to concepts of equity. This will include examining issues such as gender equality, human rights and livelihoods in relation to climate change, agriculture and food security.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand climate change and gender linked ramifications in four pillars of food security: food availability, food accessibility, food utilization and food systems stability.
  2. Outline gender linked differences in other key issues in the context of climate change (water, health, migration patterns due to environmental degradation)
  3. Underline the importance of involving women as agents of change in climate change responses and incorporate gender perspectives in research agendas, information, and climate change responses.
  4. Appreciate the gender-relevance of frameworks for policy analysis, databases, methods and ex ante impact assessment for planning responses to climate change in agriculture.
  5. Generate ideas for gender sensitive responses to the effects of climate change – in technology developments and financing mechanisms (gender analysis of budget lines and financial instruments for climate change, gender-sensitive investments in programmes for adaptation, mitigation, technology transfer and capacity building).
  6. Outline how governments can incorporate gender perspectives into their interventions on climate change
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Climate change vulnerability, impacts, and adaptation: why does gender matter?. Gender & Development, 10(2), 10-20." by Denton, F.
  2. "Uncertain predictions, invisible impacts, and the need to mainstream gender in climate change adaptations. Gender & Development, 10(2), 51-59." by Nelson, V., Meadows, K., Cannon, T., Morton, J., & Martin, A.
  3. "Climate change: Learning from gender analysis and women's experiences of organising for sustainable development. Gender & Development, 10(2), 21-29." by Dankelman, I.
  4. "The gender dimensions of poverty and climate change adaptation. IDS bulletin, 39(4), 24-31." by Demetriades, J., & Esplen, E.
  5. "No climate justice without gender justice: an overview of the issues. Gender & Development, 17(1), 5-18." by Terry, G.
  6. "Climate justice: A new social movement for atmospheric rights." by Pettit, J.
  7. "Climate justice and historical emissions. Critical review of international social and political philosophy, 13(1), 229-253." by Meyer, L. H., & Roser, D.
  8. "The Trade-off between Intra-and Intergenerational Equity in Climate Policy (No. 4285). CESifo Working Paper." by Kverndokk, S., Nævdal, E., & Nøstbakken, L.
  9. "Climate geoengineering: solar radiation management and its implications for intergenerational equity. Stanford Journal of Law, Science & Policy" by Burns, W. C.
  10. "Women: The key to food security." by Brown, L. R., Feldstein, H. S., Haddad, L., & Peña, C.
  11. "Gender, development, and climate change." by Masika, R. (Ed.)
  12. "Climate Change and Global Policy Regimes" by Timothy Cadman
  13. "Gender and Climate Change: An Introduction." by Dankelman, I.
    Publisher: Earthscan
  14. "Gender and Climate Change Research in Agriculture and Food Security for Rural Development http://www.fao.org/docrep/018/i3385e/i3385e.pdf" by FAO and CCAFS
  15. "Gender in Agriculture Sourcebook" by Gender in Agriculture Sourcebook
    Publisher: World Bank, Washington DC, USA
The above information outlines module PAB5104: "Gender, Agriculture & Climate Change" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5117: Understanding Ireland’s Agriculture & AgriFood Sector


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 5

The module is designed to allow postgraduate students working on an agri or agrifood related topics to contextualise their research within the broader context of agriculture and the agrifood sector in Ireland. Students will be enabled to understand the origins of the Irish agriculture and agrifood sectors, current status, challenges and opportunities of national and international relevance. The module will be of particular relevance to PhD and Masters degree students within the Plant and AgriBiosciences Research Centre, Teagasc Walsh Fellows in NUI Galway and other universities, and in general any research students seeking to contextualise their research through improved understanding of Ireland agriculture and agrifood systems. The module will be taught in conjunction with experts from Teagasc and other partner organisations of the PABC, and will include lectures/seminars from leading international experts. The course will provide an overview of the origins of Irish agriculture, its place in local, national and European context, the policy which regulates it and how research in related areas contributes to its continued sustainable development. Students will augment their learning experience with a visit to a local farming enterprise and interaction with the agricultural community. Students will conclude the module by making a presentation of a topic of relevance to Irish agriculture; and by writing a report that describes how their own area of Thesis research relates to the wider context of the field. This report will be of written following the guidelines for Thesis preparation (including referencing), to ensure that it can be adapted as a component of the introductory chapter of the student’s Thesis. Successful completion of the module will depend upon satisfactory performance in both elements of the assessment.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Summarise the main factors which have affected the development of agriculture in Ireland
  2. Explain the linkages between agri-related research across different research areas;
  3. Identify priority and opportunity areas in which research can assist the development of Irish agriculture and agrifood systems;
  4. Write a report placing their own research topic in the broader context of Irish agriculture and agrifood systems;
  5. Demonstrate an improved ability to make oral and written communications of their research topic in context of Irish agriculture and agrifood systems;
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module PAB5117: "Understanding Ireland’s Agriculture & AgriFood Sector" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5115: AgriFood Sustainability & Agri-Resilience Challenges


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 5

The module will provide researchers with an understanding of the major sustainability and resilience challenges facing agriculture and agrifood systems in Ireland and internationally (including in developing and rapidly growing economies). The module will provide students with a cutting-edge understanding of major planetary boundaries relating to agriculture, and their inter-relationships with agriculture, diets, public health, food systems, markets and value chains. In the context of the development of future agricultural and agrifood systems in Ireland, students will gain an understanding of different scenarios and trajectories for agriculture and agrifood systems. Students will be required to identify emerging areas for disciplinary and inter-disciplinary research that can improve prospects for addressing sustainability and resilience challenges facing agriculture and agrifood systems in Ireland and internationally.The module will be taught in conjunction with experts from Teagasc and other partner organisations of the PABC, and will include lectures/seminars from leading international experts. The module will include field course visits to agricultural sustainability initiatives, including value chain and business models that have a substantial agrifood sustainability component. This course is examined by the production of (i) an interactive learning journal, hosted via Blackboard, in which students will reflect upon each of the taught sessions and assigned elements of the literature; (ii) participation in a Class Excite “Elevator Pitch” workshop in which each student will present a case-study of an environmental mitigation strategy.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the major sustainability and resilience challenges facing the agriculture and agrifood sector globally
  2. Describe the major sustainability and resilience challenges facing the agriculture and agrifood sector in Ireland
  3. Identify research priorities and opportunities for improving sustainability and resilience of agriculture and agrifood systems
  4. Have an improved understanding how different research skills and inter-disciplinary approaches can develop and deliver agri-sustainability innovations
  5. Suggest strategies for improving the sustainability and resilience potential of agricultural and agri-food activities related to their own research area/topic
  6. Communicate in an Elevator Pitch format how their research topic can be relevant to agriculture and agrifood sustainability
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (50%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module PAB5115: "AgriFood Sustainability & Agri-Resilience Challenges" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5116: Understanding AgriBusiness & AgriFood Market Trends


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module will provide research students with an improved understanding of agribusiness structures and dynamics, in Ireland and internationally. The student will gain insights into agri-economics, agri-business, and agri-market trends. Particular focus will be placed on understanding value chains and the role of research and innovations in driving change, economic and commercial benefits for value-chain stakeholders. Students be provided with insights into food systems and geospatial, material and environmental footprint dimensions of agrifood systems. The module will also provide insights into social, demographic, behavioural and gender dimensions of agriculture and agrifood systems, particular in relation to agrifood systems generating both social and economic impacts in Ireland and internationally. The module will be taught by NUI Galway PABC members in conjunction with experts from Teagasc and other partner organisations of the PABC, and will include lectures/seminars from leading international experts. The module will involve a field study visit to the Teagasc Rural and Economy Centre in Athenry. During the course, students will maintain a Blackboard journal in which they record their experiences and are encourage to reflect on how the topics relate to the future impacts of their own research; an overview of this process will be included in the first taught session. The final assessment of the course is via a ‘business elevator pitch’ to a judging jury in which the student presents how an idea developed during a research program (related to their own project, where applicable) could be used to develop a new product, service or market opportunity.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Summarise the dynamics of national and international agrifood markets and trends
  2. Understand the basic components for developing an agri-business plan
  3. Identify new export markets for agricultural and food products or services
  4. Develop and present a business plan for exploitation of an international market
  5. Appreciate the contribution of different disciplines and research approaches for developing and implementing a business plan for an agrifood product or service
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (50%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module PAB5116: "Understanding AgriBusiness & AgriFood Market Trends" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5101: Climate Change, Agricultural & Global Food Security


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module provides an introductory overview of the key topics on the Climate Change, Agriculture and Global Food Security masters degree. The module will provide students with an introduction to a range of climate change, agriculture and food security topics in the context of current challenges regarding sustainable global development.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the current climate change challenges regarding sustainable global development.
  2. Display a clear understanding of the implications of these challenges on sustainable production and global food security.
  3. Identify and discuss the issues and evidence surrounding these challenges and related approaches to mitigation.
  4. Evaluate options for climate change mitigation and adaptation stategies in the context of sustainable production and food security.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Climate Change, Agriculture & Global Food Security" by Godfray, H. C. J., Beddington, J. R., Crute, I. R., Haddad, L., Lawrence, D., Muir, J. F., ... & Toulmin, C.
  2. "Achieving food security in the face of climate change: Final report from the Commission on Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change." by Beddington, J., Asaduzzaman, M., & Clark, M.
  3. "Simultaneously mitigating near-term climate change and improving human health and food security. Science," by Shindell, D., Kuylenstierna, J. C., Vignati, E., van Dingenen, R., Amann, M., Klimont, Z., ... & Fowler, D.
  4. ". Food security, farming, and climate change to 2050: Scenarios, results, policy options (Vol. 172). Intl Food Policy Res Inst." by Nelson, G. C., Rosegrant, M. W., Palazzo, A., Gray, I., Ingersoll, C., Robertson, R., ... & You, L.
  5. "Options for support to agriculture and food security under climate change. Environmental Science & Policy, 15(1), 136-144." by Vermeulen, S. J., Aggarwal, P. K., Ainslie, A., Angelone, C., Campbell, B. M., Challinor, A. J., ... & Wollenberg, E.
  6. "Climate change impacts on global food security. Science," by Wheeler, T., & von Braun, J.
  7. "Handbook on Climate Change and Agriculture." by Ariel Dinar, Robert O. Mendelsohn
  8. "Climate Change and Food Security: Adapting Agriculture to a Warmer World." by David B. Lobell, Marshall Burke
  9. "Impact on Agriculture and Costs of Adaptation" by Impact on Agriculture and Costs of Adaptation
The above information outlines module PAB5101: "Climate Change, Agricultural & Global Food Security" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB3101: Soil Science


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

An introduction to soil sciences in natural and agricultural environments. The module will also include assessment of plant interactions with their physical environment. The course examines how the distribution and growth of plants responds to climate, soil, nutrients and salinity. The course will prepare students for understanding soil-plant-environment interactions in ecological, physiological and agronomic contexts.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Critically assess the importance of links between plant and crop communities and their prevailing environment, including climate, soil type, and the availability of water and nutrients.
  2. Relate the characters of plant communities to variation in nutrient status, soil and salinity.
  3. Describe, measure and calculate key characteristics of soils from different habitats.
  4. Make and interpret soil profiles and texture triangles.
  5. Relate different soils to their possible agricultural uses, and consider the possible environmental impacts of these.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module PAB3101: "Soil Science" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5111: PAB5111 CCAFS Perspectives


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module will provide a range of different and multi-disciplinary perspectives & case studies on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security involving seminars and discussion with CCAFS experts from government, research centres, universities, NGOs, private sector and other stakeholders. The module will develop students breadth of knowledge and perspectives regarding CCAFS and develop critical thinking skills that are of relevance for research to inform decision-making and actions regarding climate change, agriculture and food security.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Consider how different disciplines and sectors have differing perspectives regarding climate change, agriculture and food security
  2. Appreciate how presentations and case studies on CCAFS topics can be differently framed by different sectors and disciplines
  3. Critically review case studies and perspectives in the context of CCAFS challenges
  4. Present and discuss opinions in an open forum as a group and individually.
  5. Learn how to present questions to different CCAFS stakeholders and to engage in dialogue with other disciplines/sectors regarding CCAFS topics
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module PAB5111: "PAB5111 CCAFS Perspectives" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5110: CCAFS Science Communication


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Science communication can aim to generate support for scientific research or study, to inform decision making, political and policy thinking. This module will develop an understanding of the interactions between science and society, ensuring an understanding of the social significance of science in society. This module with introduce topics in science communication, internet and social media skills, social marketing and critical thinking regarding science and CCAFS communication activities.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Critically evaluate which sources of information regarding climate change, agriculture and food security are most reliable and trustworthy.
  2. Discuss a technical scientific topic for various audiences through news print, broadcast and social media
  3. Identify key approaches and constraints for environmental and risk communication regarding CCAFS
  4. Assess the efficacy of different science communication approaches in context of CCAFS
  5. Consider different approaches for the analysis and implementation of effective science communication
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Communicating climate change: Why frames matter for public engagement. Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development, 51(2), 12-23." by Nisbet, M. C.
  2. "Constructing the scientific citizen: science and democracy in the biosciences. Public understanding of science, 10(1), 1-18." by Irwin, A.
  3. "What’s next for science communication? Promising directions and lingering distractions. American Journal of Botany, 96(10), 1767-1778." by Nisbet, M. C., & Scheufele, D. A.
  4. "Social marketing: Influencing behaviors for good." by Lee, N. R., & Kotler, P.
    Publisher: Sage Publications.
  5. "The new influencers: A marketer's guide to the new social media" by The new influencers: A marketer's guide to the new social media
    Publisher: Linden Publishing.
The above information outlines module PAB5110: "CCAFS Science Communication" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5109: PAB5109 AgriBiological Responses to Climate Change


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Global climate change impacts can already be observed in many physical and biological systems. Climate change will affect agriculture and forestry systems through higher temps, elevated CO2 concentration, precipitation changes, increased weeds, pests, and disease pressure, and increased vulnerability of carbon pools. This module will examine biological responses of plants/crops and agri-systems to climate changes.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Appreciate how climate change can impact on environmental adaptation of biological organisms of relevance to agriculture and agri-food systems
  2. Discuss the difference between avoidance, acclimation and adaptation
  3. Describe how susceptibility to, or tolerance of stress can explain plant survival and habitat preferences
  4. Summarise photosynthetic pathways and how they are affected by different environmental conditions, including climate change
  5. Describe different plant stresses and the implications for global crop productivity.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Crop Adaptation to Climate Change" by Yadav et al.
    Publisher: Wiley Blackwell.
  2. "Climate Change and Agriculture: An economic analysis of global impact, adaptation and distributional effects." by Mendelsohn, R., and Dinar, A.
  3. "Climate Change in the 21st Century" by Cohen, S., and Waddell, M.
  4. "Plant growth and climate change" by Morison, J., and Moredroft, M.
  5. "Plants on the Margins" by Crawford, R.
The above information outlines module PAB5109: "PAB5109 AgriBiological Responses to Climate Change" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5108: Climate Change, Natural Resources & Livelihoods


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module deals with how climate change is affecting soils, microbes, water and marine systems, including impacts on sustainable livelihoods and livelihood security. In many instances, climate change impacts are requiring an urgent need for response measures that minimize current vulnerabilities. By understanding how climate change impacts on natural resources and capital, response and resilience systems for adaptation and mitigation of negative effects of climate change can be fostered.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe which social or economic groups within the community are particularly vulnerable to climate change
  2. Evaluate which resources are most important to the livelihoods of different social groups
  3. Identify how current climate hazards affect livelihoods and related resources of different groups
  4. Assess which livelihoods resources are most vulnerable to climate change
  5. Investigate adaptation and mitigation strategies to maintain viable livliehoods when faced with climate change challenges
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module PAB5108: "Climate Change, Natural Resources & Livelihoods" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB4104: Plant and Agri-Biotechnologies


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module provides an advanced understanding of plant and agri-biotechnologies. Such biotechnologies encompass a wide range of technologies and they can be applied for a range of different purposes, such as the genetic improvement of plant varieties and animal populations to increase their yields or efficiency; genetic characterization and conservation of genetic resources; plant or animal disease diagnosis; vaccine development; and improvement of feeds. Some of the technologies may be applied to all the food and agriculture sectors, such as the use of molecular DNA markers or genetic modification, while others are more sector-specific, such as tissue culture (in crops and forest trees), embryo transfer (livestock) or triploidization and sex-reversal (fish). When appropriately integrated with other technologies for the production of food, agricultural products and services, biotechnology can be of significant assistance in meeting the needs of an expanding and increasingly urbanized population.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. To provide an advanced understanding of the range and applications of plant and agricultural biotechnologies for meeting human needs.
  2. To be able to describe plant and livestock improvement strategies using biotechnological approaches.
  3. To consider how biotechnological approaches can be used to meet agricultural and sustainability challenges.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module PAB4104: "Plant and Agri-Biotechnologies" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

More productive and resilient agriculture will need better management of natural resources, such as land, water and soil. Graduates of the MSc.ACT will not only be able to find work or future research working towards food security goals but also help mitigate the negative effects of climate change, in . They will also be able to pursue PhD studies, for example in the Plant & AgriBiosciences Structured Phd. 

The programme has been designed to develop graduates who are empowered to carry out research within agriculture-related activities in temperate, subtropical or tropical environments. The unique combination of field-and discipline-related activities within the same programme qualifies the graduate to carry out adviser- or policy-related activities within agricultural development. 

Potential professional activities include:

  • Agricultural Development project manager;
  • Environmental change lobbyists and activists;
  • Agriculture and climate change advisor;
  • Corporate Carbon market and accounting specialists for agriculture and forestry;
  • Extension, grassroots Education and Community change agents;
  • Agricultural and environmental policy analysts, advisors and programme officers.
  • Sectors of particular relevance are:
  • Funding and Development Agencies;
  • Consultancy companies on agriculture, natural resource management and the environment;
  • Non-governmental organisations;
  • Professional organisations.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€4,500 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Tuition

€4,276 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Non EU

€9,000 p.a. 2017/18
For more details please see http://master-act.eu/admission/fees/

Find out More

Prof. Charles Spillane & Dr. Peter McKeown,
Plant & AgriBiosciences Research Centre (PABC),
Office ADB-2006,
Áras de Brún,
National University of Ireland Galway,
University Road, Galway
H91 REW4
Ireland.
http://master-act.eu/
www.plantagbiosciences.org
E: charles.spillane@nuigalway.ie  /  peter.mckeown@nuigalway.ie
T: +353 86 796 3624