Inaugural Lecture Series

New Professors' Inaugural Lecture Series

The College of Arts, Social Sciences, and Celtic Studies is hosting a series of lectures by recently appointed Professors in the College. The Lectures take place in the Moore Institute for Research in the Humanities and Social Studies. The first lecture took place on  Thursday March 8th at 5pm when the Dean of College, Professor Cathal O'Donoghue spoke on the subject of “Recognising Diversity and Complexity in Policy Formation”.

 

Date

Lecturer

Title and Links

Cathal O'Donoghue

8th March, 2018 at 1p.m.

Professor Cathal O'Donoghue

 

"Recognising Diversity and Complexity in Policy Formation" 

Lecture Summary and Presentation

 Macruairc2

10th April, 2018, at 5.30 p.m.

Professor Gerry MacRuairc

“Caution: Children at School Perspectives on Learning, Leaders and Learners. Imperatives for Inclusive Schools”

Lecture Summary and Presentation

 

 Brian McGuire

 3rd May, 2018 at 1p.m

Professor Brian McGuire

 "Online therapies for people with chronic health conditions: Prospects and challenges."

Lecture Summary and Presentation

NReilly

21st June, 2018

5p.m.

Professor Niamh Reilly

"The political and social thought of Tom Kettle (1880-1916): Recovering a distinctive Irish thinker"

Lecture Summary and Presentation

Lecture Series Introductions 2018

 Professor Cathal O'Donoghue

“Recognising Diversity and Complexity in Policy Formation”

Presentation Slides

Introduction:

Professor O'Donoghue has been from 2016, the Dean of Arts and Social Sciences at NUI Galway and Professor of Public and Social Policy. Prior to this he was since 2005, Head of Teagasc’s (Irelands Agriculture and Food Development Authority) Rural Economy and Development Programme, one of the 4 research programmes of Teagasc. He was a member of the Fund Council of CGIAR, a $1 billion a year International Agri-Food Research organisation from 2014-2016. From 2012-2014, he was CEO of the Irish Government's Commission for the Economic Development of Rural Areas 2012-2014, Chairman of the Irish Sport Horse Strategy Committee 2013-2015, President of the International Microsimulation Association 2011-2015 and is on the Executive of the UK Agricultural Economics Society.

In his inaugural lecture, Professor O'Donoghue will draw upon the results of his research career to date to describe the methodologies he has developed and conclusions he has drawn for policy analysis and design and to reach out to new collaborators in inter-disciplinary research. His research aims to understand how policy impacts across the population, incorporating the breadth of diversity that exists in different population groups. His  field of research is in the area of Micro-Simulation Modelling, where for 25 years , he has developed tools to simulate the impact of public policy on Micro distributions (individuals, Families, Farms). Fundamentally these are tools to understand complexity. Policy formation involves understanding complexity via complexity of policy, complexity of population structure and complexity of behavioural response. In addition, other dimensions that can be considered include spatial and temporal complexity. In this lecture, Professor O'Donoghue will discuss how the development of these tools have been used to consider policy questions such as anti-poverty, environmental, labour market, education, agricultural and rural policy. His work is currently focusing on the interaction between land-use change and demographic both in a contemporary setting and in understanding historical land use drivers of demographic changes. 

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Professor Gerry Mac Ruairc

“Caution: Children at School Perspectives on Learning, Leaders and Learners. Imperatives for Inclusive Schools” 

 headphones 3Live Link to lecture
Introduction

The purpose of this address is to problematize a number of elements in our current school system with a view to identifying ways in which schools can become more inclusive, nurturing spaces for all learners irrespective of class, gender, ability, ethnicity, sexuality or the intersectional, interconnected nature of these social categorisations. In doing this, Gerry will outline a number of vignettes that represent issues or dilemmas within the Irish education system. These vignettes draw on personal and professional experiences. Some are autobiographical, based on experience as a student, a teacher, a school inspector and more recently a researcher and teacher educator; others are based on media interpretations of aspects of the school system more broadly.

These examples will serve to identify and explicate fault lines or points of departure for a critical examination of a number of underlying issues that impact the field of education, specifically these will relate to the persistence of ‘grand narratives’ in framing school experience and determining educational outcomes, the legacy of neo liberalism on discourse and practice in education and the marginalisation of theoretical perspectives in policy and reform  The final part of this address will focus on exploring ways in which many of the issues identified can be  explored differently, in ways that change the learning  experiences  of children and young people in school. By explicating how schools can work with diversity and difference and by problematizing the ways in which exclusionary practices prevail in schools, it is possible to identify a number of ways forward. This type of emancipatory engagement with the theoretical roots of education coupled with the Gramscian idea of teachers as organic intellectuals whose task it is not only to understand but to transform provides a very strong imperative for more radical action. Finally, this exploration concludes with a focus on the crucial and critical role school leaders can play in redefining and reshaping schools in order to include. An exemplar of leadership practice from a current research project on leadership and diversity in schools will confirm that, when leadership is explicitly informed by a strong commitment to inclusion and equity, exceptional outcomes are achievable. 

Gerry Mac Ruairc is the Established Professor of Education and Head of the School of Education. Previously Gerry was a teacher, school inspector and associate professor in the School of Education in University College Dublin. He has lead a number of research projects in literacy, school improvement, leadership and teacher education funded by Atlantic Philanthropies, the Department of Education and Skills, the World Bank, the EU Commission and Erasmus +.  He has also designed, developed and directed a number of graduate programmes in Education including two innovative, online/blended courses on school leadership. Gerry has also held a Fellowship in Teaching and Academic Development. He is a lead partner in consortium of three universities (NUIG, UCD and UL) that won the Department of Education and Skills and Centre for School leadership tended to design and teach a national Post-Graduate Diploma in School Leadership (PGSL) as well as a linked and blended version of the programme for Irish Medium schools hosted by the School of Education at NUI Galway. Currently he is working with Ecole supérieure de l'éducation nationale - www.esen.education.fr on a bid in response to this call . The aim is to run a network of relevant organisations to promote co-operation and the development and implementation of policies with regard to teachers and school leaders.

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Professor Brian McGuire

"Online therapies for people with chronic health conditions: Prospects and challenges."

In this talk, Prof. Brian McGuire from School of Psychology will describe the growing use of internet-based psychological therapies to help people with chronic health conditions to cope and adapt to their conditions.  He will describe the research carried out in his group to help people with conditions such as chronic muscular pain and chronic headache, chronic fatigue following cancer, multiple sclerosis and other chronic conditions. His talk will describe the potential benefits of these therapies as well some of the challenges in making them more widely available.

Brian McGuire is a Professor of Clinical Psychology. He is a graduate of NUI Galway and has also completed a Masters Degree in Clinical Psychology (Sydney), a Diploma in Criminology (Sydney), a Diploma in Health Science (Clinical Teaching, NUI Galway) and a PhD in clinical psychology (Sydney). He worked initially as a research psychologist in brain injury rehabilitation in London. He then moved to Sydney where he spent the next 10 years lecturing in psychology at several universities and working as a clinical psychologist. His clinical work was initially in the area of learning disability and challenging behaviour, before he moved into private practice where his work focused on medicolegal assessment and the rehabilitation of persons with chronic pain, acquired brain impairment, and those recovering from work and motor accidents. It was in that context that his interest in symptom magnification and malingering developed and he completed his PhD in that area. After leaving Australia, Brian was Consultant Clinical Psychologist in brain injury rehabilitation where he co-ordinated the clinical services of several in-patient rehabilitation units in the north of England. After returning to Ireland, Brian worked with the Galway Association learning disability service. He joined NUI, Galway in 2003 and was the Director of the Doctor of Psychological Science programme in Clinical Psychology until 2014 when he took up his post as HRB Research Leader in Population Health.  In addition, he is Director of the Doctor of Psychological Science for Qualified Clinicians and Joint Director of the Centre for Pain Research.

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Professor Niamh Reilly

"The social and political thought of Tom Kettle: Recovering a distinctive Irish Thinker"

Tom Kettle (1880-1916) is not very well known in Ireland today. Yet, historian Senia Pašeta notes he ‘was associated with almost every major political and cultural development’ during his lifetime. He was a gifted public intellectual, essayist, journalist, nationalist MP (1906-1910) and a soldier killed in the Battle of the Somme in 1916. In the first decade of the 20th century competing visions of future independent Ireland had vied for space, from ‘Irish-Irelander’ to cosmopolitan. Kettle stood for constitutional democracy and a non-sectarian, self-governing Irish nation and cautioned against the insular tendencies of cultural nationalism.  After his death, many appreciations lamented the loss of his brilliance -- as a thinker and writer, and especially as an orator. Following the 1916 Rising and the turn to separatist nationalism, Kettle was almost forgotten. Recently, he has figured more prominently in public discourse than at any time since his death. In this limited narrative, he is invoked as a conciliatory figure who demonstrates the possibility of combining the identities of 'British soldier', 'Irish patriot' and 'European' and is largely constructed as a precursor to Ireland's contemporary business-friendly 'centre-right'. However, there is a larger and more complex story to be told about Tom Kettle. He was a vocal advocate for the rights women and labour and a Catholic intellectual who supported the separation of Church and State.  Although his qualities as an activist thinker were widely recognised during his lifetime, Kettle's extensive writings and speeches have been largely ignored since. This lecture draws on continuing research into the social and political thought of Tom Kettle. It outlines the expansive scope of his thinking and influences, and his ideas about democracy and social justice, Irish nationalism and unionism, national development, religion and religious identity, militarism and internationalism --  all of which, it is argued, remain salient today.

Niamh Reilly is Established Professor of Political Science and Sociology at the National University of Ireland, Galway. She has published widely on issues of gender and human rights; feminist political and social theory; religion and gender in the public sphere; transnational women's movements and the United Nations; and women, peace and security. Her book, Women's Human Rights: Seeking Gender Justice in a Globalizing Age (Polity Press, 2009) was selected as an "Outstanding Academic Title for 2010" by the American Library Association/CHOICE. She is co-author of Demanding Accountability: The Global Campaign and Vienna Tribunal for Women's Human Rights (UNIFEM 1994) (with Distinguished Professor Charlotte Bunch, Rutgers University).  Niamh has many years' experience working with United Nations processes and Civil Society Organisations internationally and has served as an independent expert on the Irish government's Department of Foreign Affairs' Standing Committee on Human Rights (1997-1999) and its Consultative Group to draft Ireland's National Action Plan on UN Security Council 1325 (2010-2011). Before joining NUI Galway in 2007, Niamh was a Research Council of the UK Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster and a postdoctoral fellow in Women's Studies and Politics at the University of Limerick Ireland. Niamh is co-founder (with Dr. Breda Gray) the NUI Galway-UL research network Gender ARC.  Her research interests focus on the theory and practice of gender, human rights and international politics. Her most recent book is an edited collection (with S Scriver) entitled Religion, Gender and the Public Sphere (Routledge 2014). She is editor of The Human Rights of Women (Springer, Major Reference Works, forthcoming 2018).   In the context of Ireland's decade of centenaries (1912-1922), she is currently preparing a book on the political and social thought of Thomas Kettle (1880-1916).

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